• All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out.

  • I.F. Stone

vrijdag 29 april 2016

The Zionist Pharaoh

On Passover, Israel and "Demographic Threats"

Thursday, 28 April 2016 00:00 By Brant Rosen, Truthout | Op-Ed
The weeklong Jewish festival of Passover is coming to a close, but like many Jews around the world I'm still digesting the myriad questions, answers and discussions that ensued as we retold the biblical story of the Exodus at our seder. While it's a story our community returns to over and over again, I'm continually astonished at the ways it provides a frame for understanding struggles for liberation past and present.
This year, I've been contemplating one aspect of the story in particular: when a new pharaoh arises over Egypt "who did not know Joseph." We immediately learn in no uncertain terms that this new ruler was considerably more xenophobic than his predecessor:
And (Pharaoh) said to his people, "Look, the Israelite people are much too numerous for us. Let us deal shrewdly with them, so that they may not increase; otherwise in the event of war they may join our enemies in fighting against us." (Exodus 1:8-9)
To use contemporary parlance, Pharaoh clearly views the Israelites as a "demographic threat" to the Egyptians.
The demographic threat meme, of course, has been played out countless times since the age of the pharaohs. It has certainly been a deeply woven thread in the fabric of American culture from our very origins. To cite but one example: Centuries before Donald Trump started railing against Mexican "criminals" and "rapists," Benjamin Franklin wrote a 1751 essay in which he bemoaned the influx of "Palatine Boors" into the colonies who would "shortly be so numerous as to Germanize us instead of our Anglifying them, and will never adopt our language or customs, any more than they can acquire our complexion."
So yes, as an American, I can't read these words from the Exodus story without connecting it to an ignoble aspect of my own country's legacy -- one that is all too real even today.
And as an American Jew, I can't help but connect it to another country that also purports to act in my name.

Democracy and demographic engineering simply do not go hand in hand.

Indeed, ever since Israel's establishment, Zionist leaders knew well that the future Jewish state would only be "viable" if it could create and maintain a demographic Jewish majority in historic Palestine. In the late 19th century, this must surely have seemed like a tall order, since Jews constituted but 2 to 5 percent of the population. By 1947, following decades of Zionist colonization and Jewish immigration, their number had swelled to 32 percent. Under the UN-sponsored partition plan, the percentage of Jews allotted to the new Jewish state would have been 55 percent.
During the 1948 war -- known as the War of Independence by Zionists and the Nakba ("catastrophe") by Palestinians -- the issue of demographics was solved through the forced expulsion of Palestinians from their homes and Israel's refusal to allow them to return. However, the demographic stakes were raised once again in 1967, when Israel conquered the West Bank and Gaza and began a military occupation that exists to this day.
In 2010, Jews officially become a minority population from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea; around the same time, it was determined that the Jewish majority in Israel proper was slowly diminishing. For some time now, Zionists have been warning that the Palestinians' birth rate poses a "demographic threat" to the future of the Jewish state.
Perhaps the most surprising aspect of this rhetoric is that it doesn't only come from Israel's far right, but from liberal Zionists, who use the demographic argument to advocate for a two-state solution. Witness, for instance, the words of J Street executive director Jeremy Ben-Ami:
When it comes to Israeli-Palestinian peace, the two-state solution and the inexorable demographic threat to Israel's future as a democratic state that remains the homeland for the Jewish people, our position is the same as that of the Israeli government, the Obama administration and the vast bulk of the American Jewish community.
Leaving aside the issues of whether or not the two-state solution actually is the policyof the Israeli government, let's unpack this statement for a moment. The liberal Zionist argument for a "democratic Jewish state" is predicated on a view of Palestinians as a "demographic threat." As an American, if I referred to any other ethnic group in this country with such a term, I would surely be viewed as a bigot or a racist. But as a Jew, I can refer to Palestinians with this epithet and still remain a member in good standing of the liberal peace camp.
Thus the inherent contradiction of liberal Zionism: democracy and demographic engineering simply do not go hand in hand. At the end of the day, there is nothing liberal about supporting an ethno-national project predicated upon the identity of one group over another. The late Meir Kahane, revered by Israel's ultra right, loved to make liberal Zionists squirm by repeatedly articulating this point: "A western democracy and Zionism are not compatible. You can't have both."
Kahane's solution, of course, was "forced transfer" of the Palestinian population. The current government of Israel is accomplishing this goal through more subtle means: home demolitionsland expropriation and the revocation of Palestinians' residency and citizenship. In truth, Israel has been dealing with its demographic threat under cover of US support for years, all the while claiming the mantle of "the only democracy in the Middle East."
This, along with its massive settlement expansion has brought Israel's demographic problem home to roost. The real decision before them is not between a one-state or two-state solution, but between two one-state solutions: an apartheid Jewish state or one state of all its citizens, regardless of religion or ethnicity.
As I watch this tragic process unfold this Passover, I find myself returning to the universal lesson this festival imparts on the corrupt abuse of state power. Although the Exodus story is considered sacred in Jewish tradition, it would be a mistake to assume that the contemporary state of Israel must be seen as equivalent to the biblical Israelites.
On the contrary, any people who suffer under oppressive government policies are, in a sense, Israelites. And any state -- even a Jewish state -- that views a people in its midst as a demographic threat can become a Pharaoh.
Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

BRANT ROSEN

Brant Rosen is the rabbi of Tzedek Chicago and the Midwest regional director of the American World Service Committee.

    Geen opmerkingen:

    Een reactie plaatsen