• All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out.

  • I.F. Stone

zaterdag 29 januari 2011

Arab Regimes 25

Het is te hopen dat de zogeheten nieuwe wereldorde vernietigd word, maar dan ook totaal. Blijf niet zitten wachten op niets, doe er aan mee, kom in beweging, trap het neoliberale zwendelsysteem eruit. Accepteer niets meer. Saboteer waar en wat u kunt.

Brzezinski’s Feared “Global Awakening” Has Arrived
Monumental worldwide rallying cry for freedom threatens to derail new world order agenda
by Paul Joseph Watson January 29, 2011

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=22995

Zbigniew Brzezinski’s much feared “global political awakening” is in full swing. Revolts in Egypt, Yemen, Tunisia and other countries represent a truly monumental worldwide rallying cry for freedom that threatens to immeasurably damage the agenda for one world government, but only if the successful revolutionaries can prevent themselves from being co-opted by a paranoid and desperate global elite.

During a Council on Foreign Relations speech in Montreal last year, co-founder with David Rockefeller of the Trilateral Commission and regular Bilderberg attendee Zbigniew Brzezinski warned of a “global political awakening,” mainly comprising of younger people in developing states, that threatened to topple the existing international order.

Reading the full extent of Brzezinski’s words in light of the global revolts that we now see spreading like wildfire across the planet provides an astounding insight into how crucially important the outcome of this phase of modern history will be to the future geopolitical course of the world, and in turn the survival and growth of human freedom in general.

For the first time in human history almost all of humanity is politically activated, politically conscious and politically interactive… The resulting global political activism is generating a surge in the quest for personal dignity, cultural respect and economic opportunity in a world painfully scarred by memories of centuries-long alien colonial or imperial domination… The worldwide yearning for human dignity is the central challenge inherent in the phenomenon of global political awakening… That awakening is socially massive and politically radicalizing… The nearly universal access to radio, television and increasingly the Internet is creating a community of shared perceptions and envy that can be galvanized and channeled by demagogic political or religious passions. These energies transcend sovereign borders and pose a challenge both to existing states as well as to the existing global hierarchy, on top of which America still perches…

The youth of the Third World are particularly restless and resentful. The demographic revolution they embody is thus a political time-bomb, as well… Their potential revolutionary spearhead is likely to emerge from among the scores of millions of students concentrated in the often intellectually dubious “tertiary level” educational institutions of developing countries. Depending on the definition of the tertiary educational level, there are currently worldwide between 80 and 130 million “college” students. Typically originating from the socially insecure lower middle class and inflamed by a sense of social outrage, these millions of students are revolutionaries-in-waiting, already semi-mobilized in large congregations, connected by the Internet and pre-positioned for a replay on a larger scale of what transpired years earlier in Mexico City or in Tiananmen Square. Their physical energy and emotional frustration is just waiting to be triggered by a cause, or a faith, or a hatred…

[The] major world powers, new and old, also face a novel reality: while the lethality of their military might is greater than ever, their capacity to impose control over the politically awakened masses of the world is at a historic low. To put it bluntly: in earlier times, it was easier to control one million people than to physically kill one million people; today, it is infinitely easier to kill one million people than to control one million people.

Zbigniew Brzezinski

It is important to stress that Brzezinski was not lauding the onset of this “global political awakening,” he was decrying it. As one of the of the chief architects of the “existing global hierarchy” to which he makes reference, Brzezinski himself is under direct threat, as is the continuing ability of the global elite in general to control world affairs.

Brzezinski laments the fact that the Internet has made it almost impossible for the global elite to control the political environment, to control the thoughts and behavior of one million people, which is precisely why Egypt moved to shut down the world wide web yesterday in a desperate bid to prevent activists from organizing against the state.

As is routine whenever riots and revolutions suddenly appear as if out of nowhere, history warns us to not take what we see at face value, and to recall the numerous contrived “color revolutions” that have served little purpose other than to allow the IMF/World Bank global elite to overthrow a rogue power and seize the country via the backdoor through puppet regimes it subsequently installs.

However, the domino-like effect of the global revolution that has accelerated in recent weeks seems to be born out of a genuine, grass roots, organic yearning for real freedom, and an end to dictatorial regimes that the United States and the banking elite have helped to prop up.

The global revolt spreading across the Middle East and North Africa, having already touched Europe with the riots and strikes in Italy, France, Greece and the United Kingdom last year, is characterized as a backlash against dictatorship, police brutality, and political repression. These factors have been seething undercurrents of resentment for years, but only thanks to greater education and easier access to information and the ability to organize through the Internet has a new generation of activists finally said enough is enough. Spiraling food prices, fuel inflation, lower wages and high unemployment have also played a central role.

As Andrew Gavin Marshall writes in his excellent article, Are We Witnessing the Start of a Global Revolution?, “We must not cast aside these protests and uprisings as being instigated by the West, but rather that they emerged organically, and the West is subsequently attempting to co-opt and control the emerging movements.”

In the case of Egypt, Yemen and Tunisia, all three regimes have enjoyed the multi-decade support of the US military-industrial complex. All three were fully compliant vassal states for the new world order. There was no need for contrived or staged “color revolutions” to be prompted by the global elite in these countries.

Indeed, the die was cast when the Obama administration expressed its support for 30 year dictator Hosni Mubarak in the form of a PBS interview yesterday when Vice-President Joe Biden implied that the protesters demands were illegitimate.

“The reflex action of the imperial powers is to further arm and support the oppressive regimes, as well as the potential to organize a destabilization through covert operations or open warfare (as is being done in Yemen),” writes Marshall. “The alternative is to undertake a strategy of “democratization” in which Western NGOs, aid agencies and civil society organizations establish strong contacts and relationships with the domestic civil society in these regions and nations. The objective of this strategy is to organize, fund and help direct the domestic civil society to produce a democratic system made in the image of the West, and thus maintain continuity in the international hierarchy. Essentially, the project of “democratization” implies creating the outward visible constructs of a democratic state (multi-party elections, active civil society, “independent” media, etc) and yet maintain continuity in subservience to the World Bank, IMF, multinational corporations and Western powers.”

Remember – any country that retains its own sovereignty, acts primarily in its own interests and attempts to build itself up as a strong, prosperous, and culturally strong state is an enemy to the globalists. The international hierarchy demands compliance, dependence, weakness and a dilution of heritage and culture in order for every nation to be enveloped within the sphere of global government control.

Make no mistake about it, we are seeing a global revolution, the age of rage is falling upon us like dominoes reaching to every corner of the planet. Whether or not the outcome will topple the current global hierarchy, as Zbigniew Brzezinski fears, remains to be seen, but it will surely depend upon who controls the new governments that will replace the ousted rulers – the people who started the process of change, or the World Bank, IMF, NGO’s and the rest of the global elite who are desperate to save their world government agenda from being derailed.

I'm In The Mood


John Lee Hooker and Bonnie Raitt play "I'm In The Mood"


The Empire 748

Liberating the American people: USA must free itself from Israel or face the consequences
By Gilad Atzmon

30 January 2011

Gilad Atzmon looks at how the US’s Israel-driven policy in the Middle East is unravelling with the impending fall of its key vassal, Egypt’s Husni Mubarak. He argues that the only way forward for the USA is to start pursuing its own national interests, not those of Israel – which it can do only if it unshackles itself from the Israel lobby.
In his latest Newsweek article Stephen Kinzer wonders who America is betting on in the popular rising forces in the Middle East: “The same friends it has been betting on for decades,” he answers. “Mubarak’s pharaonic regime in Egypt, Mahmoud Abbas and his Palestinian Authority, the Saudi monarchy, and increasingly radical politicians in Israel. It is no wonder that Iran’s power is rising as the American-imposed order begins to crumble,” he concludes.

Kinzer explains America's stance succinctly and accurately:
The US keeps Mubarak in power – it gave his regime 1.5 billion dollars in aid last year – mainly because he supports America’s pro-Israel policies, especially by helping Israel maintain its stranglehold on Gaza. It supports Abbas for the same reason; Abbas is seen as willing to compromise with Israel and is, therefore, a desirable negotiating partner... American support for Mubarak and Abbas continues, although neither man is in power with any figment of legality; Mubarak brazenly stage-manages elections, and Abbas has ruled by decree since his term of office expired in 2009.

US policy in the service of Israel

“For decades American foreign policy has been dictated by Zionist forces within the administration. For decades, America has been exhausting its resources to chase the enemies of the Jewish state. It even sends its young boys and girls to fight and die in Zionist wars.”
In the light of Kinzer's statement, the following questions surely need answering: Why does America support those regimes whose leaders' dictates, ideologies and methods of ruling are totally and openly incongruous with America’s alleged value system? And If America is genuinely concerned with the so-called “rise of Islam”, why, then, did it eradicate Saddam Hussein’s distinctly secular regime? And if America is, as it claims, enthusiastic about encouraging “non-radicalised” secular Arabs, why is it constantly seeking conflict with Bashar Asad, leader of another secular stronghold? And If America does indeed champion democracy, why does it support the Saudi regime, Mubarak and Abbas? Why does it not seek friendship with the democratically-elected Hamas?

In short American policy seems to be a total mess – unless one is willing openly to admit that there is a clear coherent thread running through American foreign policy: it simply serves Israel’s interests.
For decades American foreign policy has been dictated by Zionist forces within the administration. For decades, America has been exhausting its resources to chase the enemies of the Jewish state. It even sends its young boys and girls to fight and die in Zionist wars. The second Iraq war was obviously such a war. It is becoming clear that America’s decision makers have sacrificed the interests of the American people.

Zionist witch hunts of US patriots

On 28 January we learned that the Jewish lobby in America has shamelessly slammed Republican Senator and Tea Party representative Rand Paul for suggesting that the “United States should halt all foreign aid, including its financial aid, to Israel”. Even the alleged “peace-seeking” J Street was quick to attack the patriotic senator. And clearly they didn’t mince their words. A statement issued by J Street said:
Senator Paul’s proposal would undermine the decades-long bipartisan consensus on US support for Israel. Any erosion of support should concern Israel’s friends on both sides of the political aisle, and we call in particular on leaders and donors in Senator Paul’s party to repudiate his comments and ensure that American leadership around the world is not threatened by this irresponsible proposal.
National Jewish Democratic Council (NJDC) President and Chief Executive Officer David Harris repeated the same line of thought, saying that “Paul's suggestion is negligent, shortsighted and just plain wrong... Senator Paul's statement is yet another illustration of how the Republican Party continues to grow increasingly out of touch with the values of the vast majority of the American Jewish community."

But Harris fails to grasp that the patriotic senator Paul is actually concerned with the interest of America, rather than the tribally-orientated “values of the vast majority of the American Jews”, because Senator Rand Paul obviously points at a clear conflict between American interests and the foreign interests promoted by the Jewish lobby.

Vassals of the Jewish lobby

In his Newsweek article, Kinzer astutely points out that America needs “new approaches and new partners. Listening more closely to Turkey, the closest US ally in the Muslim Middle East, would be a good start. A wise second step would be a reversal of policy toward Iran, from confrontation to a genuine search for compromise.”

But, It is clear beyond doubt here that America will not be able to integrate Kinzer's very reasonable suggestions into its foreign policy unless it first liberates itself from the grip of the Jewish lobby. But it has been proven that it is not easy for our greed-driven politicians to emancipate themselves voluntarily from the lobby. As we read above, the “liberal” J Street group have called upon donors to cut off the very life supply of Senator Rand Paul. And the Jewish lobby in America would do the same to every American politician who dared to break the links.

However, in the wake of the current financial turmoil, I am convinced that more and more Americans are beginning to identify the root cause at the bottom of their flawed foreign policy. By the time this happens, America may well be liberated.

In the meantime, here is my musical take on the subject, “Liberating the American People” (2006):

Israel as a Rogue State 332

US ambassador’s bid to get Richard Falk sacked from UN opens a can of worms

By Stuart Littlewood

30 January 2011

Stuart Littlewood exposes the US Israel lobby’s role in the campaign against the UN Human Rights Council's special rapporteur in the Palestinian territories, Richard Falk, and takes a look at the relationship between one of Falk’s leading detractors, US ambassador to the UN Susan Rice, and Israel.

Mention Richard Falk and you think of an honourable man who cares deeply about injustice, particularly the trampled rights of Palestinians under the evil jackboot.

Mention Susan Rice, US Ambassador to the United Nations, and what comes to mind?

The BBC reported in December 2008: “During her stint in the Clinton White House, she was described as ‘brilliant’ but also ‘authoritarian’ and ‘brash’. According to the New York Times, she acknowledges ‘a certain impatience at times’.”

She is also said to be "unwilling to consider opinions that differ from her own".

Fair comment

“Falk’s crime was saying that the US administration’s reluctance to address the awkward gaps and contradictions identified by several scholars in the official explanations of 9/11, only fuels suspicions of a conspiracy.”
Ambassador Rice has just demanded that Falk, the UN Human Rights Council's special rapporteur in the Palestinian territories, step down from his UN position. “In my view, Mr Falk’s latest commentary [an entry in his blog about the media and 9/11] is so noxious that it should finally be plain to all that he should no longer continue in his position on behalf of the UN.”

Falk’s crime was saying that the US administration’s reluctance to address the awkward gaps and contradictions identified by several scholars in the official explanations of 9/11, only fuels suspicions of a conspiracy. And he suggested that "what may be more distressing than the apparent cover up is the eerie silence of the mainstream media, unwilling to acknowledge the well-evidenced doubts about the official version of the events: an Al-Qaeda operation with no foreknowledge by government officials".

Fair comment, you might think. And carefully worded to cause no offence.

Enter the American Jewish Committee

But Reuters reported that UN Watch, an advocacy group affiliated with the American Jewish Committee, had written to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon similarly demanding that he "strongly condemn Mr Falk's offensive remarks – and ... immediately remove him from his post".

The report added that UN Watch had targeted Falk in the past and frequently criticized the Human Rights Council for berating Israel while ignoring rights violations by developing countries.

The American Jewish Committee also called on the UN to immediately dismiss Falk for publicly endorsing “the slander of conspiracy theorists”. Executive Director David Harris said:
We agree wholeheartedly with the US Permanent Representative to the UN, Ambassador Susan Rice, who stated that Mr Falk’s comments are ‘despicable and offensive’ and, like her, urge the UN to remove him from his position. Falk has long been a conspiracy-ridden and harmful figure who surely does not serve the best interests of the UN.
UN Watch claims to have won “global condemnation” of Falk. Its website trumpets: “After UN Watch exposes noxious remarks, UN official Richard Falk [is] roundly condemned by UN chief, US Gov't, and media worldwide.”

“Noxious” – that’s Rice’s word. Could they be sharing the same scriptwriter?

UN Watch diligently sets down who said what:
Thursday, 20 January: UN Watch takes action and files complaint with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, demanding he condemn Richard Falk, the UN Human Rights Council's permanent investigator on "Israel's violations of the principles of international law", for his latest remarks suggesting that the US government – and not Al-Qaeda terrorists – destroyed the World Trade Centre. The protest came as part of UN Watch's three-year campaign to expose and combat Falk's denial and justification of Hamas and Al-Qaeda terrorism, and his material support for 9/11 conspiracy theorists. At the daily UN press briefing, when Matthew Lee of Inner City Press asks for a response, the secretary-general's spokesman says they don't comment on independent experts.

Friday, 21 January: The New York Daily News picks up the story and publishes editorial: "When will the lunacy reach such heights that UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon realizes his so-called Human Rights Council is wrecking what little reputation the world body has left?... Ignore those jetliners crashing into the towers, is Falk's advice. Who are you going to believe, your own eyes or him and his friends? Ban should ring down the curtain on this grotesque buffoonery. He should force out Falk forthwith..."

Monday, 24 January: The United Nations sends letter to UN Watch with unprecedented condemnation of a UN Human Rights Council official: "The secretary-general condemns [Falk's] remarks. He has repeatedly stated his view that any such suggestion is preposterous — and an affront to the memory of the more than 3,000 people who died in the attack". UN Watch immediately releases the letter to the public, and calls for the UN to fire Falk.

Tuesday, 25 January: US Ambassador Susan Rice condemns Falk and echoes UN Watch's call for him to be fired: "Mr Falk’s comments are despicable and deeply offensive, and I condemn them in the strongest terms... The United States is deeply committed to the cause of human rights and believes that cause will be better advanced without Mr Falk and the distasteful sideshow he has chosen to create." Ambassador Eileen C. Donahoe, the US envoy to the Human Rights Council, also speaks out.

On the same day, in a Geneva address to the member and observer states of the Human Rights Council, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon repeats his condemnation of Falk: "Recently, there was a special rapporteur who suggested there was an 'apparent cover-up' in the 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. I want to tell you, clearly and directly. I condemn this sort of inflammatory rhetoric. It is preposterous – an affront to the memory of the more than 3,000 people who died in that tragic terrorist attack.”

SUCCESS: UN Watch's campaign led to the unprecedented international condemnation of Richard Falk, who exploits his UN position to justify and deny Hamas and Al-Qaeda terrorism. It sparked dozens of news stories worldwide, as shown in the sample below. All of this succeeded in finally puncturing Falk's undeserved halo as a "human rights expert". For the first time ever, the UN itself had condemned Falk, and in the strongest terms. As a result, Falk's credibility in the international arena is now at zero.
What’s remarkable is how twitchy these people get at the slightest possibility that someone will lift the lid on 9/11, their hysterical protests serving only to deepen already serious suspicions.

Incidentally UN Watch’s founder, chairman and executive director are all Jewish, the latter having worked at Israel’s Supreme Court.

Ambassador Susan Rice “handmaiden to the Zionist cause”

“Having revealed herself as another handmaiden to the Zionist cause, [US Ambassador to the UN Susan] Rice’s attack on Falk for breaking the ridiculous taboo and questioning the US administration’s refusal to hold a proper independent inquiry into 9/11 only raises questions about her own suitability for an important position at the UN.”
Let's go back to 14 July last year and remarks made by Ambassador Rice during a reception for Israeli ambassadors Gabriela Shalev and Daniel Carmon held by the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations. Rice said:
Today, I mostly want to talk about my very dear friend, Ambassador Gabriela Shalev. She’s truly one of my favorite people...

Gabi and I had the opportunity to work closely together on a series of important issues, fromdealing with the deeply flawed Goldstone Report to seeing through the passage by the Security Council of the toughest sanctions resolution to date against Iran. She has been a lioness in defence of Israel’s security and its legitimacy — working tirelessly to ensure that Israel has the same rights and enjoys the same responsibilities as any other UN member state.

We will continue to work together to seek a lasting and comprehensive peace that meets Israel’s security needs and creates a viable, sovereign Palestinian state. We will continue to strengthen Israel’s qualitative military advantage so that Israel can always defend itself, by itself, against any threat or possible combination of threats. And, as the president pledged, we will continue US efforts to combat all international attempts to challenge the legitimacy of Israel — including and especially at the United Nations.
Having revealed herself as another handmaiden to the Zionist cause, Rice’s attack on Falk for breaking the ridiculous taboo and questioning the US administration’s refusal to hold a proper independent inquiry into 9/11 only raises questions about her own suitability for an important position at the UN.

Meanwhile, there are millions of us out here who are right behind Richard Falk because he stands for justice. We are not amused by growing indications that the official story of 9/11 doesn't add up. Nor are we too pleased by the realization that it was used to prod our own governments into sacrificing troops and treasure to a couple of unlawful, unwinnable wars that have caused mega-deaths and endless suffering to innocent civilians, trashed our good name abroad and made us vulnerable to reprisals at home – just to advance the crazed ambitions of the US-Israeli axis.

In short, if there’s the slightest doubt we want to know the truth.

Arab Regimes 24

De NRC, een krant die nooit door heeft wat er nu precies aan de hand is. Carolien Roelants is wel de grootste onbenul op het gebied van de Arabische wereld, ze ziet nooit iets aankomen en achteraf heeft ze de domste analyses. 'Heel vervelend' allemaal.


Moslimbroederschap: onrust zal tirannieke VS-bondgenoten doen omvallen

BUITENLAND 


“Heel vervelend voor Amerika”, zo noemt Midden-Oosten deskundige Carolien Roelants van NRC de uitspraken van de Jordaanse Moslimbroederschap vandaag. De leider van de machtige beweging zei dat de onrust in Egypte zich zal verspreiden over het Midden-Oosten en de Arabische landen. “Hun tirannieke leiders, gelieerd aan de VS, zullen ten val worden gebracht”, aldus Hammam Said.

Hoewel de moslimleider Koning Abdullah II niet specifiek noemde, is het volgens Roelants een impliciete oproep tot het opstappen van de koning.
“Het is gebruikelijk dat de Broederschap de premier aanvalt. Die kun je missen, zoals Mubarak zijn regering inruilde. Maar door te stellen dat de VS-bondgenoten ten val zullen worden gebracht, zegt Said hier impliciet dat Koning Abdullah weg moet. Als je die publiekelijk aanspreekt, dan is er echt wat aan de hand.” De Midden-Oosten deskundige wijst er op dat Jordanië de grootste bondegnoot van de VS is; samen met Egypte heeft het een vredesverdrag met Israël. “De uitspraken van de Moslimbroederschap zijn heel verevelend voor Amerika”, sluit Roelants af.
Hammam Said sprak namens de Moslimbroederschap in Jordanië bij een demonstratie tegen president Mubarak voor de Egyptische Ambassade in Amman. Hij haalde de onvrede onder Arabieren over de Amerikaanse overheersing van hun olierijkdom aan. De militaire bezetting van Irak en Afghanistan en Amerika’s steun aan “totalitaire” leiders in de regio moesten het ontgelden.
Saudie-Arabië schaart zich achter Mubarak
Koning Abdullah van Saudie-Arabië liet vandaag vanuit Amerika weten dat “het Koninkrijk met al haar middelen achter Egypte en zijn volk staat”. Volgens hem is er geen enkele tolerantie mogelijk van inmenging in de veiligheid en stabiliteit van Egypte. “Het zijn mensen die infilteren in de naam van vrijheid van meningsuiting. Ze exploiteren en injecteren hun vernietigende haat.” Saudie-Arabië is een belangrijke bondgenoot van Amerika in het Midden-Oosten.

Boycot Israel 99


Een Europese sportmanifestatie in Israel? In een schurkenstaat die de Palestijnen onderdrukt? Steun een boycot. Sportiviteit in een staat die het internationaal recht permanent schendt. Welke gek verzint dit? Bovendien is Israel geen Europees land, net zo min als andere landen uit het Midden-Oosten dit zijn. Hoe kan dit het best gesaboteerd worden?


Israël krijgt EK onder 21 jaar in 2013

Uitgegeven:27 januari 2011 21:22
Laatst gewijzigd:27 januari 2011 21:22

NYON - Het Europees kampioenschap voor voetballers onder 21 jaar vindt in 2013 in Israël plaats. Dat heeft de Europese voetbalbond UEFA donderdag besloten.

Israël kreeg de voorkeur boven Bulgarije, Tsjechië, Engeland en Wales. Op 3 februari wordt geloot voor de kwalificatiereeks, waaraan ook Jong Oranje meedoet.
De Israëlieten zijn als organiserend land automatisch geplaatst voor het EK. De eerste keer dat de Israëlische beloften meededen aan het Europese titeltoernooi was in 2007 in Nederland.

Denemarken

Dit jaar wordt het EK gespeeld in Denemarken. Jong Oranje heeft zich onder leiding van bondscoach Cor Pot niet weten te plaatsen voor dat toernooi.
Nederland, dat twee keer het EK onder 21 wist te winnen, moest in de play-off buigen voor Oekraïne.
© ANP

Arab Regimes 23

JAN 28

THE EGYPT PROTESTS

The Egypt Protests
01. Egyptian anti-government protesters clash with riot police at the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egyptian protests against lack of work, rising food prices and the oppressive regime of President Hosni Mubarak seem to be moving towards a climax. Today the Egyptian government has shut down all internet access and text messaging service to try and prevent people from finding out about the protests. And to stop people from finding out about the police brutality which has been going on for decades, as can be read in the Wikileaks Egypt Cables released today. It takes brave, or desperate, people to stand up to people with guns so we wish the people of Egypt well.Warning: Some images are graphic.
UPDATE: Live streams from Egypt. Protesters are urging the army to join them and not side with the government or police.
UPDATE 2: New images added. A curfew has been put in place and the army is said to have been called in by the governement aka Hosni Mubarak.
UPDATE 3: Several more images added of the street battles in Cairo. Mubarak has called in the army to help out the police and armoured vehicles and tanks have been seen on the streets of Suez, Cairo and Alexandria. Mubarak has also ordered the shutting down of the mobile phone networks (Vodoafone says) in several areas of the country. This, together with the shutting down of the internet, it is hoped will prevent protesters from organising their actions. Let’s hope it doesn’t. It will be interesting to see what the Western politicians have to say about all this as they’ve always treated Mubarak as a friend and ally.
UPDATE 4 29-01-2011: New images added. Mubarak has changed his government, promised reforms, but has still sent the army out onto the streets. The Egyptians want him gone and he doesn’t get it.
The Egypt Protests
02. An anti-government protester gestures during clashes with police in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
03. Egyptian plainclothes policemen arrest an anti-government protester during clashes in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
04. A man shouts in front of riot police in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
05. Riot police clash with protesters in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
06. A riot policeman holds his face after being injured during clashes with anti-government protesters in downtown Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
07. Riot police clash with protesters in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
08. A riot policeman walks past burning tyres placed to form a barricade during clashes with protesters in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
09. Riot police keep watch as they hold shields during clashes with protesters in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
10. Plainclothes police arrest a protester during clashes in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
The Egypt Protests
11. Riot police stand on a street during clashes with protesters in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
The Egypt Protests
12. Riot police clash with protesters in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
The Egypt Protests
13. Plainclothes police arrest a protester during clashes in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
The Egypt Protests
14. Anti-government protesters clash with riot police near burning tyres placed as a barricade during clashes in Cairo January 26, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians defied a ban on protests by returning to Egypt's streets on Wednesday and calling for President Hosni Mubarak to leave office, and some scuffled with police. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
15. People surround the ambulance transporting Gharib Abdelaziz Abdellatif in the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 26, 2011. Gharib, 45, died of internal bleeding after police shot him in the stomach on Wednesday, according to medical sources. Police fought with thousands of Egyptians who defied a government ban on Wednesday to protest against President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule, firing rubber bullets and tear gas and dragging away demonstrators. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
16. Teargas is used during anti-government protests after the funeral of Gharib Abdel Aziz in the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 26, 2011. Gharib, 45, died of internal bleeding after police shot him in the stomach on Wednesday, according to medical sources. Police fought with thousands of Egyptians who defied a government ban on Wednesday to protest against President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule, firing rubber bullets and tear gas and dragging away demonstrators. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
17. A relative of Gharib Abdelaziz Abdellatif holds onto the ambulance carrying him in the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 26, 2011. Gharib, 45, died of internal bleeding after police shot him in the stomach on Wednesday, according to medical sources. Police fought with thousands of Egyptians who defied a government ban on Wednesday to protest against President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule, firing rubber bullets and tear gas and dragging away demonstrators. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
18. People, including relatives of Gharib Abdelaziz Abdellatif, attempt to enter the hospital grounds to retrieve his body in the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 26, 2011. Gharib, 45, died of internal bleeding after police shot him in the stomach on Wednesday, according to medical sources. Police fought with thousands of Egyptians who defied a government ban on Wednesday to protest against President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule, firing rubber bullets and tear gas and dragging away demonstrators. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
19. A relative of Gharib Abdelaziz Abdellatif cries during his funeral in the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 26, 2011. Gharib, 45, died of internal bleeding after police shot him in the stomach on Wednesday, according to medical sources. Police fought with thousands of Egyptians who defied a government ban on Wednesday to protest against President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule, firing rubber bullets and tear gas and dragging away demonstrators. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
20. Police surround protesters in front of the press syndicate in Cairo January 27, 2011. Egyptian police fought protesters in two cities in eastern Egypt on Thursday and Nobel Peace Prize winner Mohamed ElBaradei headed back to the country to join demonstrators trying to oust President Hosni Mubarak. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
The Egypt Protests
21. Mohamed Atef lies on the ground after being shot in the head while demonstrating in the town of Sheikh Zoweid, 344 km (214 miles) northeast of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Security forces shot dead Mohamed, a Bedouin protester, in the north of Egypt's Sinai region on Thursday, eyewitnesses and a security source said. The 22-year-old man was shot in the head while demonstrating in the town of Sheikh Zoweid, they said. Security forces fired tear gas to disperse dozens of protesters. REUTERS/Stringer
The Egypt Protests
22. Mohamed Atef is carried after being shot in the head while demonstrating in the town of Sheikh Zoweid, 344 km (214 miles) northeast of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Security forces shot dead Mohamed, a Bedouin protester, in the north of Egypt's Sinai region on Thursday, eyewitnesses and a security source said. The 22-year-old man was shot in the head while demonstrating in the town of Sheikh Zoweid, they said. Security forces fired tear gas to disperse dozens of protesters. REUTERS/Stringer
The Egypt Protests
23. Mohamed Atef lies on the ground after being shot in the head while demonstrating in the town of Sheikh Zoweid, 344 km (214 miles) northeast of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Security forces shot dead Mohamed, a Bedouin protester, in the north of Egypt's Sinai region on Thursday, eyewitnesses and a security source said. The 22-year-old man was shot in the head while demonstrating in the town of Sheikh Zoweid, they said. Security forces fired tear gas to disperse dozens of protesters. REUTERS/Stringer
The Egypt Protests
24. Egyptian anti-government protesters attack a riot police car at the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in Suez on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
25. Protesters scuffle with riot police during a demonstration outside the press syndicate in central Cairo January 27, 2011. Demonstrations demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, in power since 1981, have raged since Tuesday in several Egyptian cities, with the biggest clashes in Cairo and Suez. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis (EGYPT - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
The Egypt Protests
26. Mariam Solayman, a member of an Egyptian activist group, shouts anti-government slogans in front of a police cordon during a demonstration outside the press syndicate in central Cairo January 27, 2011. Demonstrations demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, in power since 1981, have raged since Tuesday in several Egyptian cities, with the biggest clashes in Cairo and Suez. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
27. Egyptian anti-government protesters start a fire in the fire station in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule, a witness said. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
28. A protester displays a message on a placard of the Egyptian flag during a demonstration outside the press syndicate in central Cairo January 27, 2011. Demonstrations demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, in power since 1981, have raged since Tuesday in several Egyptian cities, with the biggest clashes in Cairo and Suez. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
29. An Egyptian anti-government protester prepares to throw a burning object at the Suez Fire Station at the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule, a witness said. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
30. Egyptian anti-government protesters throw Molotov cocktails at the Suez Fire Station at the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
31. Egyptian riot police try to extinguish flames on their shields after anti-government protesters threw burning objects at them in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
32. Riot police form a wall behind a burning barricade set up by anti-government protesters in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
33. Smoke rises from objects being burnt to form a roadblock as people react after Mohamed Atef was shot in the head while demonstrating in the town of Sheikh Zoweid, 344 km (214 miles) northeast of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Security forces shot dead Mohamed, a Bedouin protester, in the north of Egypt's Sinai region on Thursday, eyewitnesses and a security source said. The 22-year-old man was shot in the head while demonstrating in the town of Sheikh Zoweid, they said. Security forces fired tear gas to disperse dozens of protesters. REUTERS/Stringer
The Egypt Protests
34. Anti-government protesters run as they throw objects at riot police in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
35. Anti-government protesters use fire extinguishers outside the Suez fire station in the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule, a witness said. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
36. Police officers carry an injured colleague during clashes with anti-government protesters in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
37. An anti-government protester holds a tear gas canister fired by the police during clashes in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
38. A police officer kicks away a tear gas canister during clashes with anti-government protesters in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
39. Anti-government demonstrators watch as tear gas is fired by police in an attempt to disperse them in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
40. Riot police stand near their vehicle during clashes with anti-government protesters in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
41. Firefighters attempt to extinguish a fire on a police vehicle during clashes with anti-government protesters in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
42. Egyptian reformed campaigner Mohamed ElBaradei talks to journalists outside Cairo's airport, January 27, 2011. ElBaradei said he expected large demonstrations across Egypt on Friday and that the time had come for President Hosni Mubarak to leave power. REUTERS/Stringer
The Egypt Protests
43. Smoke rises from a fire burning at the Suez fire station during clashes between anti-government protesters and the police in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in Suez on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
44. Plainclothes police arrest an anti-government protester during clashes in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
45. An anti-government protester reacts as his relative is injured during clashes with riot police in the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in Suez on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
46. An anti-government protester uses a fire extinguisher in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule, a witness said. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
47. An anti-government protester throws objects at a riot police vehicle in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in Suez on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
48. Police officers carry an injured colleague during clashes with anti-government protesters in the port city of Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany (EGYPT - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
The Egypt Protests
49. An anti-government protester throws objects at a riot police car in the port city in Suez, about 134 km (83 miles) east of Cairo east of Cairo, January 27, 2011. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in Suez on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-old rule. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
50. A man holds a sign with a picture of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak that reads: Dictator Mubarak, get out of Egypt during a protest held in solidarity with the Egyptian protesters, after Friday prayers in Istanbul January 28, 2011. The protest was held to demand the end of Mubarak's 30-year rule as part of a wave of unrest gripping the Middle East. REUTERS/Osman Orsal
The Egypt Protests
51. A plainclothes policeman hits a protester during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
52. A plainclothes policeman speaks with a boy as others beat protesters in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
53. A plainclothes policeman (L) runs to attack a foreign journalist as others beat a protester in front of two boys (not seen in picture) during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic )
The Egypt Protests
54. A protester runs in front of a burning barricade during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
55. A protester runs in front of a burning barricade during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
56. An injured protester bleeds during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
The Egypt Protests
58. A protester runs next to a police vehicle after throwing a bag of trash at it during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
59. A protester walks in front of a burning police vehicle in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
60. A protester gestures in front of a burning barricade during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
61. A protester stands in front of a burning barricade during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
62. A protester gestures in front of riot police during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
63. Smoke bellows over Cairo following clashes between protesters and police January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
64. Egyptian demonstrators brave police water canons and tear gas during a protest in Cairo after Friday prayers January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
65. A protester holds an Egyptian flag as he stands in front of water canons during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
66. A protester lies on the ground after inhaling tear gas during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
67. Protesters fall to the ground as they inhale tear gas during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
68. A protester gestures near a burning barricade during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
69. Police officers clash with demonstrators during a protest in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
70. A demonstrator (L) argues with police during a protest in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
71. A demonstrator stands in front of police water canons during a protest in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
72. Anti-government demonstrators (bottom) face off against riot police in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak imposed a curfew and ordered troops to back up police as they struggled to control crowds who flooded the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities on Friday to demand that he step down. REUTERS/Kyodo
The Egypt Protests
73. A protester holds stones as he shouts at police during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
74. Smoke billows over mosques in Cairo following clashes between protesters and police January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
75. A riot police officer fires tear gas during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
The Egypt Protests
76. A protester holds up an Egyptian flag during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
The Egypt Protests
77. A protester runs with a tear gas canister to throw back to the police during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
78. Protesters disable a police van by removing its batteries during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
79. An injured Egyptian riot policeman is given first aid by protesters during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak sent troops and armoured cars onto the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities on Friday in an attempt to quell street fighting and mass protests demanding an end to his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
80. A protester displays a teargas canister during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak sent troops and armoured cars onto the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities on Friday in an attempt to quell street fighting and mass protests demanding an end to his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
81. Protesters stand near the burning headquarters of the ruling National Democratic Party in Cairo January 28, 2011. The headquarters of the ruling National Democratic Party were ablaze in Cairo on Friday night, shortly after a curfew came into force. NDP branch offices in several other cities around the country were also set on fire or attacked during the day, witnesses said. REUTERS/Asma Waguih
The Egypt Protests
82. Protesters stand near the burning headquarters of the ruling National Democratic Party in Cairo January 28, 2011. The headquarters of the ruling National Democratic Party were ablaze in Cairo on Friday night, shortly after a curfew came into force. NDP branch offices in several other cities around the country were also set on fire or attacked during the day, witnesses said. REUTERS/Asma Waguih
The Egypt Protests
83. Protesters stand near the burning headquarters of the ruling National Democratic Party in Cairo January 28, 2011. The headquarters of the ruling National Democratic Party were ablaze in Cairo on Friday night, shortly after a curfew came into force. NDP branch offices in several other cities around the country were also set on fire or attacked during the day, witnesses said. REUTERS/Asma Waguih
The Egypt Protests
84. A protester burns a picture of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
85. Protesters stand near a burning police vehicle in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
86. A protester looks at a burnt Egyptian Army armoured vehicle in downtown Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak ordered troops into Egyptian cities on Friday in an attempt to quell street fighting and growing mass protests demanding an end to his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
87. A protester sets fire to the entrance of the ruling National Democratic Party building in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak ordered troops into Egyptian cities on Friday in an attempt to quell street fighting and growing mass protests demanding an end to his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
88. Protesters stand in front of a burnt Egyptian Army armoured vehicle in downtown Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak ordered troops into Egyptian cities on Friday in an attempt to quell street fighting and growing mass protests demanding an end to his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
89. A protester walks in front of a fire in downtown Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak ordered troops into Egyptian cities on Friday in an attempt to quell street fighting and growing mass protests demanding an end to his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
90. A protester walks in front of a fire in downtown Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak ordered troops into Egyptian cities on Friday in an attempt to quell street fighting and growing mass protests demanding an end to his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
91. A protester flashes a victory sign in front of police during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
92. Protesters flee through a cloud of tear gas during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
93. Protesters flee from charging police during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
94. Police beat a protester during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
95. A protester kisses a police officer during a demonstration in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
96. Martina Bashai (L), Mariam Aziz (C) of Washington, D.C., and Tamer ElAzzony (R) of Virginia shout during a protest rally organized by the Egyptian Association for Change in the U.S. (EAC-USA) in front of the White House in Washington January 28, 2011. The United States increased pressure on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak Friday to institute reforms, urging the government to view its people as a partner not a threat during unprecedented protests in Cairo. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang
The Egypt Protests
97. People shout anti-Mubarak slogans and wave Egypt flags during a protest rally organized by the Egyptian Association for Change in the U.S. (EAC-USA) in front of the White House in Washington January 28, 2011. The United States increased pressure on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak Friday to institute reforms, urging the government to view its people as a partner not a threat during unprecedented protests in Cairo. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang
The Egypt Protests
98. A plainclothes police officer points his weapon at protesters while guarding a police station during demonstrations in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
99. Protesters run next to a burning police van set on fire earlier by protesters in Suez January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak imposed a curfew and ordered troops to back up police as they struggled to control crowds who flooded the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities on Friday to demand that he step down. REUTERS/Mohamed Abdel Ghany
The Egypt Protests
100. Protesters march during an anti-government demonstration in Suez January 28, 2011. Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak said he was committed to economic and political reform and was determined to secure the stability of Egypt in a televised address to the nation after a day of anti-government protests. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
101. Smoke covers the sky during clashes between police and protesters in Suez January 28, 2011. Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak said he was committed to economic and political reform and was determined to secure the stability of Egypt in a televised address to the nation after a day of anti-government protests. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany
The Egypt Protests
102. Protesters carry a carpet with an image of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak, with a shoe placed on it, in Suez January 28, 2011. Mubarak imposed a curfew and ordered troops to back up police as they struggled to control crowds who flooded the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities on Friday to demand that he step down. REUTERS/Mohamed Abdel Ghany
The Egypt Protests
103. Protesters stand in front of the burning entrance of the ruling National Democratic Party building in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak ordered troops into Egyptian cities on Friday in an attempt to quell street fighting and growing mass protests demanding an end to his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
104. In this still image taken from video, Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak addresses the nation on Egyptian state TV in Cairo January 28, 2011. Mubarak called for dialogue and said he would name a new government on January 29, 2011. REUTERS/Handout
The Egypt Protests
105. Veiled Egyptian women run into a mosque to avoid teargas during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak said on Saturday that Egypt needed dialogue not violence to end problems that led to days of protests and said he was sacking his government, speaking in an address on state television. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
106. A protester attends to an injured man during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak said on Saturday that Egypt needed dialogue not violence to end problems that led to days of protests and said he was sacking his government, speaking in an address on state television. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
107. Protesters stand in front of a police water cannon during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak said on Saturday that Egypt needed dialogue not violence to end problems that led to days of protests and said he was sacking his government, speaking in an address on state television. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
108. A protester stands in front of riot police and a water cannon outside a mosque after Friday prayers in Cairo January 28, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak said on Saturday that Egypt needed dialogue not violence to end problems that led to days of protests and said he was sacking his government, speaking in an address on state television. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
109. Egyptian soldiers stand on top of an armoured vehicle in Cairo January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak clung to power on Saturday as protesters took to the streets again to demand that he quit. Mubarak ordered troops and tanks into the capital Cairo and other cities overnight and imposed a curfew in an attempt to quell demonstrations that have shaken the Arab world's most populous nation, a key U.S. ally, to the core. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
The Egypt Protests
110. Egyptian army soldiers stand beside an armoured tank at Tahrir Square after wide-spread protests in downtown Cairo January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
111. An Egyptian army soldier sit by a pavement after after clashing with protesters at Tahrir Square after wide-spread protests in downtown Cairo January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
112. Egyptian army soldiers confront riot police as protesters take cover at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo after wide-spread protests early January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
113. An Egyptian anti-government protester shields himself during clashes with riot police at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo after wide-spread protests early January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
114. Riot police gesture while holding their guns during a protest by anti-government demonstrators at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo after wide-spread protests early January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
115. An Egyptian anti-government protester sits next to Egyptian army soldiers at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo after wide-spread protests early January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
116. An Egyptian anti-government protester shields himself during clashes with riot police at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo after wide-spread protests early January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
The Egypt Protests
117. Protesters cheer for the army soldiers in central Cairo January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
118. Protesters parade with Egyptian flags in Cairo January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
119. Protesters cheer for the army soldiers in central Cairo January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
120. A youth takes photos of the burning building of the ruling National Democratic party in Cairo January 29, 2011. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis
The Egypt Protests
121. Protesters flee from tear gas fire during clashes in Cairo January 28, 2011. Police and demonstrators fought running battles on the streets of Cairo on Friday in a fourth day of unprecedented protests by tens of thousands of Egyptians demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

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